The mechanism of action of benzydamine on local infectious inflammation


DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.18565/pharmateca.2018.13.76-83

G.V. Poryadin, J.M. Salmasi, A.N. Kazimirsky

Department of Pathophysiology and Clinical Pathophysiology, N.I. Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia
Local infectious and inflammatory diseases are one of the most common pathologies in medical practice; for example, tonsillopharyn- gitis is a disease that is extremely common in a physician’s routine practice. To date, there are many drugs designed to the treatment of tonsillopharyngitis at the market. However, these agents have a different pharmacological effects necessary for correct therapy. In gynecological practice, infectious and inflammatory diseases of the vulva and vagina, such as specific and non-specific vulvovaginitis are one of the most frequent problems. For the topical pharmacotherapy of infectious and inflammatory diseases in gynecology, a large number of drugs with different mechanisms of action are also offered. The authors identify key mechanisms of acute and chronic inflamma- tion, which should be affected by these drugs due to their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Benzydamine hydrochloride has a pronounced antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as fungi of the genus Candida (albicans and non-albicans species), which allows to militate against etiological agent of infectious and inflammatory diseases. Also, benzydamine hydrochloride refers to the so-called «cytokine» non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that are able to suppress the inflammatory process without inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX), which does not lead to the development of side effects associated with an excessive decrease in the prostaglandin levels. The biological aspects of the interaction of drugs with various links of local immunity are also discussed; the use of benzydamine hydrochloride for local therapy of acute and chronic infectious and inflammatory processes is pathogenetically substantiated.
Keywords: acute local inflammation, chronic local inflammation, benzydamine

About the Autors


Corresponding author: Jean M. Salmasi, MD, Professor, Head of the Department of Pathophysiology and Clinical Pathophysiology, N.I. Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia; e-mail: profjms@yandex.ru Address: 1, Ostrovityanov Street, Moscow 117997, Russian Federation


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